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Thank You Movie Review - Regular, conventional, flat

July 22, 2022
Sri Venkateswara Creations
Naga Chaitanya, Raashi Khanna, Malavika Nair, Avika Gor, Sai Sushanth Reddy, Prakash Raj
B V S Ravi
Vikram K Kumar
P C Sreeram
Naveen Nooli
Venkat D. Pati & Mithun Chaitanya
Thaman
Dil Raju, Sirish & Harshith Reddy
Vikram K Kumar

'Thank You', produced by Dil Raju and Shirish on Sri Venkateswara Creations, today arrived at the cinemas.

Story

Abhiram (Naga Chaitanya) is a renowned businessman who is too self-centered to see the contribution of others to his success. This puts off his live-in partner Priya (Raashi Khanna), who can't digest the fact that Abhiram is not the old Abhiram anymore. A shattering incident leaves her completely upset and she decides to break up with him. This is when Abhiram realizes that something has been seriously amiss in his life. He takes a tour into his past and in come his ex-girlfriend (Malavika Nair), Rakshi sister (Avika Gor) and college rival (Sai Sushanth Reddy).

Performances

Naga Chaitanya never came this close to portraying a flawed character since '100% Love'. He makes his performance look intimate in the scenes where he has to take moral lessons. While he could have brought more believability to the businessman portions, he looks endearing in the teen portions.

Raashi Khanna, as the prime driver of the story in the first act, is so-so. She received so much criticism for failing to get the emotional beats right in some of her previous movies like 'World Famous Lover'. With this, the 'Pakka Commercial' actress makes up for the loss, at least to an extent. Malavika Nair is ordinary, while Avika Gor is natural.

Sai Sushanth Reddy can emerge as a good supporting artiste. As for Prakash Raj, he is solid. Tulasi, RJ Hemanth, and Sampath Raj have forgettable parts.

Technical aspects

PC Sreeram's recent Telugu films, namely 'Naa Nuvve' and 'Rang De', were not known for exceptional visuals. 'Thank You' is among the better of his works in Telugu (leaving aside the excellent 'Kushi' and 'Ishq').

Thaman's music should have been far more affecting. The Farewell Song is too much unoriginal. 'Ento Enteynto' is enjoyable, while 'Maaro Maaro' is boisterous. Naveen Nooli's editing is adequate.

Analysis

As far as Naga Chaitanya's character is concerned, it is multi-dimensional and comes in different shades. Yet, in an instance of exceptional failure, the film doesn't give more than what its trailer had conveyed.

Abhiram is a suave businessman who has developed a world-famous App that can revolutionize diagnostics. He was, in his past, a meek teenager who stood no chance of winning a cup in a boat race. He was once a hockey player against whom a politician's son conspired. The situations and scenarios are too many for the film to look jaded. But the potential in the writing doesn't get translated in terms of story-telling and execution.

Some films cease to hold any surprises after the trailer, promos and songs have been seen. 'Thank You' is such a film. The one character that was a bit unpredictable is Prakash Raj's Rao. He appeared to be Abhiram's disheartened father or Priya's worried father in the trailer. But he turns out to be something else.

Songs in a feel-good movie should feel different when watched as part of the narrative. Here, it doesn't happen. The 'Farewell Song' is as good or as bad as it is as a standalone number. The bedroom romance between Abhiram and Priya is soulless; we don't feel for the latter's plight in the subsequent portions.

The 'manassakshi' appearing as a person who looks like us and dishes out lessons to us directly is an outdated trope. This movie brings it back to life, only to kill any interest around it.

The first half is a bit better compared to the second half, where the college portions and hockey segment are notoriously flat.

Closing Remarks

'Thank You' is below-average. The film is not purposeless or directionless. But the scenes are not emotionally involving enough.

Critic's Rating

2/5